Tag: part shade

  • Northern Spicebush

    Northern Spicebush

    Scientific name: Lindera benzoin Crush a leaf. Smell it. Love it. Features: tolerant of dense shade grows well under black walnut, or beech trees (juglone tolerant) food and host plant for spicebush butterfly leaves can be used to repel mosquitoes (*yet to verify, but it still smells great*) early spring bloomers with yellow flowers that […]

  • Silky Willow

    Silky Willow

    Scientific name: Salix sericea This plant has a very high wildlife value (similar in value to oak trees). I’ve only had it in the ground for about 3 years and it always provides me with something exciting to watch (even when it’s not being visited by wildlife). In the wind, the willow-shaped leaves shimmer as […]

  • Small-Flowered Crowfoot

    Small-Flowered Crowfoot

    Scientific name: Ranunculus micranthus It’s native and a prolific spreader. The deer occasionally eat it. I’ve been using it as stringy tall-ish ground cover. It only grows to about 16″ tall. Lately, I’ve been looking up the benefits of different plants, and I’ll need to get back to you on my observations for this one. […]

  • Common Blue Violet

    Common Blue Violet

    Scientific name: Viola sororia In searching for more information about this beautiful native plant, I found a lot of false information. Multiple websites call it “invasive”. People tend to falsely label plants as “invasive” because they don’t understand how it is used with respect to plant/animal life. By definition, an invasive plant or animal is […]

  • Blue-Eyed Grass

    Blue-Eyed Grass

    Scientific name: Sisyrinchium¬† Blue-eyed grass is not a true grass. It has delicate little flowers, short stature, stays green for much of the year, clumping. Seems to be popping in places I didn’t put it, which is great because it’s one of my favorites. When the flowers go away it looks like grass, and doesn’t […]

  • White Avens

    White Avens

    Scientific name: Geum canadense This is a volunteer. It’s growing happily in a semi-shaded spot in the back yard. I was almost sure it was another invasive or non-native that the previous homeowner planted (or was planted by the birds). Tip: You can identify it much better when the first leaves start growing in spring […]